About Rani Lill Anjum

I am a philosopher at NMBU, Norway. I work on causation etc.

CauseHealth workshop N=1 is now a section in JECP special issue.

CauseHealth

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The Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice has dedicated a section of its latest special issue to collect seven contributions which were previously presented in the CauseHealth workshop N=1. A further contribution from the same workshop was published by the same journal last year.

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Same cause, same effect? A guest blog on causation in science

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by Maritza Ilich Mauseth

This is a discussion of an article by J.C. Crabbe, D. Wahlsten and B.C. Dudek on the ‘Genetics of Mouse Behavior: Interactions with Laboratory Environment‘, Science, 284, 1670-1672, 1999. It is written for the course PHI302 Causation in Science at Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Mauseth is a Master student in Ecology at the Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, with 170 credits in biology and an additional 15 (soon 20) credits in Philosophy. I asked her for permission to include the discussion in my blog as an example of how philosophical reflections about causation in science can be done in practice. Continue reading

New Philosophy Resource

Philosophy Paperboy

Struggle to keep updated on the latest philosophy papers in your research area? Despair no longer! Andrea Raimondi has developed a resource called The Philosophy Paperboy. This is a webpage that ‘publishes the latest contents from philosophy journals around the world’ and it is super easy to search for keywords. I tested it with a quick search for ‘causation’ and then ‘risk’, and I found several papers that would be useful for what I am currently working on. So give it a go and send a grateful thought to Andrea and web- & graphic designer Lorenzo Cataldi, who have spent their time making philosophy research easier for the rest of us.

BJPS blog – Causation in Scientific Methods

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Need scientists worry about philosophy? Or should philosophers get off their backs and let them do their work in peace? Unsurprisingly, many scientists want to stay clear of philosophical discussions. What is more disturbing is when I hear philosophers themselves announce that our discipline has nothing useful to offer science. In my view, they could not be more wrong.

Evidence-Based or Person-Centered? An Ontological Debate

puzzle-of-cancer_scientific-americanIn a recent paper published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, I argue that the choice between EBM and person centered healthcare is a choice between conflicting ontologies, involving two very different notions of causation. While the methodology and practice of EBM seems perfectly supported by positivism and a Humean theory of causation, person centered healthcare does not. There is, however, a trend called the EBM Renaissance Movement, attempting to make EBM more person centered. In the CauseHealth project, we urge that person centered healthcare and practice requires a very different ontology and methodology from the positivist scientific ideal inspired by David Hume. Continue reading