About Rani Lill Anjum

I am a philosopher at NMBU, Norway. I work on causation etc.

New Philosophy Resource

Philosophy Paperboy

Struggle to keep updated on the latest philosophy papers in your research area? Despair no longer! Andrea Raimondi has developed a resource called The Philosophy Paperboy. This is a webpage that ‘publishes the latest contents from philosophy journals around the world’ and it is super easy to search for keywords. I tested it with a quick search for ‘causation’ and then ‘risk’, and I found several papers that would be useful for what I am currently working on. So give it a go and send a grateful thought to Andrea and web- & graphic designer Lorenzo Cataldi, who have spent their time making philosophy research easier for the rest of us.

BJPS blog – Causation in Scientific Methods

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Need scientists worry about philosophy? Or should philosophers get off their backs and let them do their work in peace? Unsurprisingly, many scientists want to stay clear of philosophical discussions. What is more disturbing is when I hear philosophers themselves announce that our discipline has nothing useful to offer science. In my view, they could not be more wrong.

Evidence-Based or Person-Centered? An Ontological Debate

puzzle-of-cancer_scientific-americanIn a recent paper published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, I argue that the choice between EBM and person centered healthcare is a choice between conflicting ontologies, involving two very different notions of causation. While the methodology and practice of EBM seems perfectly supported by positivism and a Humean theory of causation, person centered healthcare does not. There is, however, a trend called the EBM Renaissance Movement, attempting to make EBM more person centered. In the CauseHealth project, we urge that person centered healthcare and practice requires a very different ontology and methodology from the positivist scientific ideal inspired by David Hume. Continue reading

Emergence and demergence

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In the beginning of March, Stephen Mumford presented our paper ‘Emergence and Demergence’ at the Causal Powers and Social Science Conference 2016 at Yale University, organised by Philip Gorski (Yale) and Ruth Groff (St. Louis). Since the paper has already provoked a discussion, we thought it best to publish the presentation here. These ideas are still in its early stages and will be developed in more detail in an article. In the meantime, we welcome your feedback. Continue reading

PhD course at NMBU on Causation in Science

Campus14
30 May – 10 June 2016, NMBU, limited spaces

Some of the chief goals of science are understanding, explanation, prediction and application in new technologies. Only if the world has some significant degree of constancy in what follows from what can these scientific activities be conducted with any purpose. But what is the source of such predictability and how does it operate? In many ways, this is a question that goes beyond science itself – beyond the data – and inevitably requires a philosophical approach. This course starts from the perspective that causation is the main foundation upon which science is based. Continue reading

Causal or Accidental Correlation – A Challenge for Science

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In a Philosophy Bites episode, John Worrall is interviewed about how trustworthy the experiments on which evidence-based medicine rests. Specifically, he discusses how suitable randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are for establishing causation. Continue reading

The Mumford-Anjum Official Statement of Authorship

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Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum. Photo: Kristine Løwe, NMBU

1. Why a statement?

Our writing partnership in philosophy began in 2007, when Anjum arrived at Nottingham as a Postdoctoral Fellow. Since then, we have written three books and around 40 papers together, which seems rare, especially in philosophy. We think it’s time to issue a statement about our writing partnership, for at least four reasons. Continue reading